userdeck:

Metabolism Capsule.

userdeck:

Metabolism Capsule.

108 notes

oldhollywood:

Suddenly, Last Summer (1959, dir. Joseph L. Mankiewicz) (via)
“Man devours man in a metaphorical sense. He feeds upon his fellow creatures, without the excuse of animals. Animals actually do it for survival, out of hunger…. I use that metaphor [of cannibalism] to express my repulsion with this characteristic of man, the way people use each other without conscience: ‘We all use each other and that’s what we think of as love.’
It horrified me, the film. [Producer] Sam Spiegel made the mistake of inviting me to a private screening of it in his apartment and I walked out in the middle of it. I was so offended by the literal approach because the play was metaphorical; it was sort of a poem, I thought. I loved Katharine Hepburn in it, but I didn’t like the film. 
…[The death by cannibalism scene] became so realistic, with the boys chasing Sebastian up the hill - I thought it was a travesty. It was about how people devour each other in an allegorical sense.”
-Tennessee Williams, Conversations with Tennessee Williams

oldhollywood:

Suddenly, Last Summer (1959, dir. Joseph L. Mankiewicz) (via)

“Man devours man in a metaphorical sense. He feeds upon his fellow creatures, without the excuse of animals. Animals actually do it for survival, out of hunger…. I use that metaphor [of cannibalism] to express my repulsion with this characteristic of man, the way people use each other without conscience: ‘We all use each other and that’s what we think of as love.’

It horrified me, the film. [Producer] Sam Spiegel made the mistake of inviting me to a private screening of it in his apartment and I walked out in the middle of it. I was so offended by the literal approach because the play was metaphorical; it was sort of a poem, I thought. I loved Katharine Hepburn in it, but I didn’t like the film. 

…[The death by cannibalism scene] became so realistic, with the boys chasing Sebastian up the hill - I thought it was a travesty. It was about how people devour each other in an allegorical sense.”

-Tennessee Williams, Conversations with Tennessee Williams

287 notes

caseydonahue:

Watching some cops do some cop stuff right now.

caseydonahue:

Watching some cops do some cop stuff right now.

10 notes

hitrecordjoe:

ows peaceful gathering downtown. Police blocking our way.  BroadwayAndPine

hitrecordjoe:

ows peaceful gathering downtown. Police blocking our way. BroadwayAndPine

846 notes

How Film Is Made (1958)

istillshootfilm:

This is a super awesome documentary from 1958 about how film was made in the Kodak factory. Very fun to watch.



234 notes

Net Find of the day:

oliphillips:

Automated Colour Field

by Rebecca Baumann

632 notes

The Sound of Revolution

Okay - my net find of the day is somehow “revolutionary” coz it’s a german band called “Rekorder” with their album REVOLUTION - so if you wanna hear their tunes, you should stand the german sound and lyrics… hahaha…
But here is REVOLUTION:
The band and the album I found on Markus Tacker’s Blog - THANX Markus for sharing this:

Rekorder – Revolution (2008)
Markus - who seems to know the band a little longer, writes that their evolution from the first to this second album is amazing.

But they still have this typical rock-sound with it’s mingeling of melodic and rocky parts together with intelligent lyrics. 
You can hear the sound of REVOLUTION here at Amazon or on band’s MySpace-Site.

And - by the way - does the cover of the record remind somebody of something???

Hahaha - what a coincidence…?!

Documentary filmmaking is the art of capturing reality on film or video. It’s a big responsibility, and with it comes great power. When you can show your audience something that is based in reality, the opportunities for deep emotional connection and profound learning abound.

There are many different ways to approach the craft of documentary, but generally it can be categorized into three different modes or forms.

The remixing of previous cultural content and forms of a given media (most visible in music, architecture, and fashion) and the second type of remixing – that of national cultural traditions now submerge(d) into the medium of globalisation. (In the first approximation, the terms “postmodernism” and “globalisation” can be used as aliases for these two remix peradigms.)

Lev Manovich, The Anti-Sublime Ideal in New Media